kraftwerkthough:

1  2  3  4

momorsa:

Yuri Vasnetsov

momorsa:

Yuri Vasnetsov

blejz:

Yuri Vasnetsov

blejz:

Yuri Vasnetsov

gazophylacium:

Yuri Vasnetsov, Book Cover.

gazophylacium:

Yuri Vasnetsov, Book Cover.

thewoodbetween:

Yuri Vasnetsov.

thewoodbetween:

Yuri Vasnetsov.

huldrapress:

Yuri Vasnetsov via library things

huldrapress:

Yuri Vasnetsov via library things

comixology:

comiXology Unbound's #LongReads
Megahex by Simon Hanselmann (girlmountain)

Megg is a depressed, drug-addicted witch. Mogg is her black cat. Their friend, Owl, is an anthropomorphized owl. They hang out a lot with Werewolf Jones. This may sound like a pure stoner comedy, but it transcends the genre: these characters struggle unsuccessfully to come to grips with their depression, drug use, sexuality, poverty, lack of work, lack of ambition, and their complex feelings about each other in ways that have made Megg and Mogg sensations on Hanselmann’s Girl Mountain Tumblr. This is the first collection of Hanselmann’s work, freed from its cumbersome Internet prison, and sure to be one of the most talked about graphic novels of 2014, featuring all of the “classic” Megg and Mogg episodes from the past five years as well as over 70 pages of all-new material.

"Simon Hanselmann is the real deal, for sure. He captures that stoner stay-at-home life so accurately that I actually find his comics really depressing and thank god I don’t ever have to hang out with anybody like that ever again." - Daniel Clowes

[Read Megahex on comiXology]

#LongReads: Every Thursday Afternoon comiXology Unbound suggests a comic to read for those who are looking for something more than 22 pages!

themelmoshow:

lacigreen:

dama3:

baelor:

Trans Woman Dares Bible-Quoting Councilman to Stone Her to Death

that’s fucking hardcore

!!!!

This will never be overshared

great tv recommendations: monty python’s flying circus
↳ “I’ve noticed a tendency for this programme to get rather silly”

(Source: ghibli-forever)

okay, so a couple months ago, there was this kid that I graduated high school with and he got beaten up really badly in downtown Mankato after having a fight with someone. He was mistaken for someone else, but that person cracked this dude’s skull on the concrete. Its really, really horrible what happened to him. He was in the hospital for about three months.
He’s also a football player, he’s pretty well established and everyone is celebrating him, sharing blog posts that his family writes to show his process.

But the thing is, this dude was never my friend and he wasn’t particularly nice to me in high school. The popular kids at my school were nice, but there were some that wouldn’t give you the time of day. I remember thinking “wow, that kid is really arrogant.” And I feel horrible about thinking that now. But why? Because he almost died?
I think people really, really over exaggerate the personalities of people when they’ve died or been injured in a life-threatening way.
It doesn’t mean that I don’t sympathize, but if I was in the hospital, I would fucking hate it if people that I didn’t even know in high school to start talking about me like I was their best friend.

Especially when I had like, a handful of really good friends.

"The trend of labeling women “crazy” is part of the culture that socializes women to go along to get along. When women are told over and over again that they’re not allowed to feel the way they feel and that they’re being “unreasonable” or “oversensitive”, they’re conditioned to not trust their own emotions. Their behavior – being assertive, even demanding or standing up for how they feel – becomes an “inconvenience” to men and they’re taught not to give offense and to consider the feelings of others before their own."

On Labeling Women “Crazy” | Paging Dr. NerdLove - Part 2 (via evasives)

”I’ll be the rainbow when the sun is gone, Wrap you in my colors and keep you warm, That’s how strong my love is.”

(Source: gimmethestones)

nemfrog:

Utamania torda. Razor-billed Auk. Thomas Gentry. 1882.

nemfrog:

Utamania torda. Razor-billed Auk. Thomas Gentry. 1882.